2597 Glendale Ave. | Green Bay, WI 54313

Cemetery

Cemetery of the Holy Sepulchre

Cemetery Policies and Regulations 

View internments on FindAGrave.com for our cemetery.

Lots are available. Plots are $850.

If you are considering a burial at St. John the Baptist Cemetery for yourself or your loved ones,
please contact
Lynn at 920-434-2145 ext. 200.

Cemetery address: 1198 Pinecrest Road, Green Bay, WI 54313 

GK_GioiV7UBN1tkLg9F1kkwDgjrNdfQH9J98bLPh

e0RRa4pa2Aw623RCFfUqKTXZHoQa5WwHzh3alFkP

Local Funeral Homes:

Blaney Funeral Home - https://www.blaneyfuneralhome.com/

Lyndahl Funeral Home - https://www.lyndahl.com/

Pfotenhauer Funeral Home - Howard - https://www.pfotenhauerfuneralhome.com/

Proko-Wall Funeral Home & Crematory - https://www.prokowall.com/

OLD ST JOHN THE BAPTIST CEMETERY

The old "Duck Creek Cemetery"   contained about 145 gravesites. Most of the original markers from this cemetery are missing, damaged, or illegible.  Recovered stones were carefully place into this six sided memorial marker in the center of the current park/cemetery area.

A listing of the recovered stones can be viewed online here. View this cemetery on FindAGrave.com.

Memorial and gardens are located approximately 1/2 to 3/4 of a mile WNW of US41 on the NW corner of Velp Avenue and Riverside Drive in the Township of Howard, Brown County, WI.

 

 

Old Duck Creek Cemetery

 

History of Duck Creek Cemetery

Still just a stone's throw away from  the west bank of Duck Creek, Howard's Duck Creek Cemetery was established as a burial ground of the Menominee who had a village there. When fur traders and other settlers joined the Menominee in the late 1700s, they too were also buried in the cemetery then in a densely wooded forest. Traditional Menominee coffins were constructed of birchbark or other wood and could even be a hollowed out tree. The coffined, unembalmed body was placed in a shallow grave. To protect against the elements and especially wild animals, three logs were positioned over the grave; two laid on the ground with a third one across them. Stakes were used to hold the logs in place. Some graves were marked by wooden crosses that eventually gave way to the harsh Wisconsin elements.